Social Security Number When Moving-Facts

Everybody has a Social Security number to which every bit of information about a person is tied. All someone has to do is type an SSN into an SSN search site and the subject’s bank account number, residence, phone number and other details such dental or criminal records are revealed. While this information is relevant if the one inquiring about you is out to prove your reliability, the danger is when somebody plans to steal your identity through an SSN search. Here’s how to avoid this scenario:Nowadays, just about everyone wants your Social Security number – phone companies, video stores, health clubs, etc. It can be someone who wants to know your credit rating, then find out whether you pay your bills or not. Others want to keep track of you by way of name and address changes.You may want to check out all you need to know here for more.

There are companies that use your SSN to make marketing lists which they could sell to other companies. A listing with these numbers is more important than a list without them.The higher the number of persons who see your SSN, the more vulnerable you are to identity theft, that is, somebody posing as you by using your name and credit rating to embezzle money. Billions are lost by American businesses to identity theft each year. These costs are eventually passed on to consumers.Any business can ask for your SSN but there are very few institutions that can actually demand it. They are motor vehicle departments, tax departments, or welfare departments. Transactions that involve taxes like banks, brokerages, employers and the like have a legitimate need for your Social Security number. Most other businesses have no right to demand your SSN. While there are no laws that prohibit them from asking your number, you have the right to say no. Offer to provide them an alternative identification card. If they insist, then refrain from doing any business with them. Remember, it’s also possible that they would refuse to provide the product or service that you are seeking.

Chances are, a good number of companies that routinely ask for an SSN will agree to do business with you even if you refrain from providing them the number. These companies may ask for a Social Security number to open an account but the information is not required. It is just part of the record of the customer. Some companies follow an operating procedure if people refuse to give their SSN. They ask them to fill out a questionnaire to find out their payment history. No need for credit checks. They just bank on a person’s honesty.